Can a data lake save investment firms millions?

According to TabbFORUM, investment managers annually spend millions of dollars in avoidable direct costs due to poor data management technology and operations architecture. Within many large organizations, the management of data is left solely to the business verticals, and in some cases to individual teams. This breeds data duplication, and the quality of the final data can be questionable at best. To add insult to injury, data is obfuscated through poor usage of tools like Excel.  BMA’s, (Business Managed Applications) when built in Excel are fraught with data linage issues, along with maintenance of the sheet, which in the best of cases is tedious. Through these current entrenched practices, companies are throwing millions of dollars away.

Topics: Data management

From Data Swamps to Data Lakes


Data is the backbone of any application.
 Without good data, without a solid foundation, the applications that we build are unstable and possibly detrimental to the business: they can and will provide bad insights which may and will lead to less than desirable actions, putting the business at risk.

Has your data lake dried up yet?

This blog originally appeared on TabbFORUM.

The big push over the past few years has been the move to create enterprise Data Lakes to provide a “single source of the truth,” along with control, efficiency and responsiveness. This often is done in line with major efforts, particularly in:

  • Risk, where it was aimed at creating a consistent basis to draw the self-reconciling views across market, credit and finance; and in
  • Legacy consolidation & re-engineering efforts, where it was to remove the duplication of data and its maintenance as a part of a mop up and displace process.

Topics: Data management

DGIQ afterthoughts

 

Hear our CTO, David Lattimore-Gay as he shares his afterthoughts on DGIQ 2016, big data and related topics.

Live from DGIQ 2016: Day 3

 

Hear our CTO, David Lattimore-Gay's latest opinions from DGIQ as he shares his views on big data and related topics. We will update vlogs on a regular basis. 

Live from DGIQ 2016: Day 2

 

Hear our CTO, David Lattimore-Gay's latest opinions from DGIQ as he shares his views on big data and related topics. We will update vlogs on a regular basis. 

Live from DGIQ 2016: Day 1

 

Hear our CTO, David Lattimore-Gay's latest opinions from DGIQ as he shares his views on big data and related topics. We will update vlogs on a regular basis. 

The Spark that ignites big data

This blog originally appeared on Tabb Forum. 


The world is data centric. We produce and consume data in an ever increasing amount. While there is value to this data, analyzing and inferring its value remains quite the challenge.

The big data platforms are a mixed bag of technologies so adoption has been slow and challenging. Just think about the knowledge required to learn all the different languages for each of the connecting pieces, creating an implementation barrier.

Visualizing financial flows using D3

D3 Packing Circles

Almost everyone is responsible for tracking finances, whether it be for an investment group or for your family. When faced with an investment or a big purchase, we don’t always rely on mental arithmetic to come up with a solution. People don’t typically close their eyes and visualize a spreadsheet and financial statements, but think in relations and networks. Raw data only becomes necessary once the amount of data becomes too overwhelming. D3,or Data-Driven Documents, can help connect these areas of thought. D3.js is a Javascript library that offers many tools to help you visualize your financial flows in a way your subconscious will appreciate.

The reality of IT and its relationship with the enterprise

The other day I read that a major software solution supplier to the financial industry (who shall remain nameless) had published a report, based on a survey, that had as a key finding that there was a disconnect between Business and IT management. I must say that I sat stunned for a few minutes, not by the finding, but by the fact that someone should have paid to find this out. This has been a factor for years, actually decades, and I can remember sitting with other CIO’s twenty years ago discussing this issue, along with the parallel one of “how we can measure and communicate the value of IT”. 

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